• 1948

    Koshima, the Beginning of Primatology in Japan

    © Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University / Itani Junichiro Archives

    The discipline of Primatology started in Japan on December 3 rd, 1948. The late Kinji Imanishi (1902-1992) and his two students, from Kyoto University, went to Koshima Island to observe wild Japanese monkeys.


  • 1953

    Sweet-Potato Washing

    © Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University / Itani Junichiro Archives

    Sweet-potato washing among Koshima monkeys was first observed.


  • 1956

    The Japan Monkey Centre (JMC)

    © Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University / Itani Junichiro Archives

    JMC was founded in 1956 to promote research, education, conservation, welfare, and communication to the public regarding nonhuman primates.


  • 1957

    PRIMATES, the Oldest International Journal of Primatology

    The Japan Monkey Centre (JMC) began the journal, “Primates”, now the oldest Primatology journal written in English.


  • 1958

    First Time Africa

    © Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University / Itani Junichiro Archives


  • 2014

    April 1st

    Beginning of a New Endeavor


    The Japan Monkey Centre (JMC) became a 'Public Interest Incorporated Foundation' from April 2014.


  • October 17th

    Happy 58th Anniversary!

    The Japan Monkey Centre (JMC) is now in the 59th year and still getting better!


The Japan Monkey Centre (JMC) is a museum and zoo that exhibits and breeds the largest number of nonhumnan primate species in the world.


JMC was established in 1956 to conduct comprehensive research on primates and to protect wild Japanese macaques. In 1957 JMC was registered as a museum under the Museum Law in Japan. JMC exhibits are designed to introduce the real life of each individual primate. JMC has many guides, curators, and researchers as well as many events held to ensure you enjoy the museum activities.

Latest News

 

Welcome to JMC!

The Japan Monkey Centre

The discipline of Primatology started in Japan on December 3rd, 1948. The late Kinji Imanishi (1902-1992) and his two students, from Kyoto University, went to Koshima Island to observe wild Japanese monkeys. By studying the social behavior of this monkey they aimed to understand the evolutionary origins of human society.

Most people may not realise that there are no species of monkeys or apes native to North America or Europe. Among G7 member state countries, Japan is unique. Japan has an indigenous species of monkey, called the Japanese or snow monkey, benefiting the study of nonhuman primates here.

Primatology is the scientific study of all primates, including humans. In order to understand ourselves as humans, it is essential to study our closest living relatives; people are keen to discover more about apes, monkeys, and prosimians such as lemurs.Thanks to the pioneering efforts of Kyoto University scholars, primatology in Japan began uniquely through fieldwork on the native wild monkeys.

Japanese primatologists worked together to help create the Japan Monkey Centre (JMC). It was founded on October 17th, 1956. The JMC aims to promote research, education, conservation, welfare, and communication to the public regarding nonhuman primates. JMC became a 'Public Interest Incorporated Foundation' from April 2014.

The JMC is also a registered museum, since 1957 producing the journal, “Primates”, now the oldest Primatology journal written in English. Primates is a leading journal in the discipline, published by Springer in collaboration with Primate Society Japan (PSJ). The JMC also runs a unique zoo, specializing in nonhuman primates, with over 1000 individuals representing 67 different species.

This is the official website of JMC, with information about ongoing projects and news updates, in English. Join us for a window onto the world of nonhuman primates. Through observing nonhuman primates we can develop a better appreciation of our place within nature, a keener desire to understand the evolutionary origins of human society and behavior.

October 15th, 2014 in Kyoto
Tetsuro Matsuawa
General Director, Japan Monkey Centre
Editor-in-chief, PRIMATES
Professor, Kyoto University
President, International Primatological Society

Directors and Tenured Curators


Museum Director
Juichi YAMAGIWA

Zoo Director
Gen'ichi IDANI

Tomo TAKANO
Rie AKAMI
Gaku OHASHI
Yuta SHINTAKU
Koshiro WATANUKI

Mission & Vision

Primate research has a multitude of important relevance in order to understand human being.

Fortunately, there are many Japanese macaques living in Japan. The government provides financial support for researching their ecology, sociology, and so on, in multiple aspects. The ongoing, long term research has produced many important results. Studying wild Japanese macaques protects the traditions of this unique field of wildlife research that has been nurtured and developed over many years, in ways as part of our Japanese heritage. The original study of Japanese macaques has been expanded to comparative studies involving most primate species that contributes to the academic development of Japan.

Here we shall establish the Japan Monkey Centre, and continue to advance its research. Using the research results we can continue to protect and propagate wild Japanese macaques and provide corresponding technical guidance to the project. In addition, we have also established and run the zoological museum, which focuses on searching for the origins of humankind. All these efforts contribute to academic training and for our cultural development.



Photo: Proffessor Itani and researchers at the entrance of Japan Monkey Centre. (Credit © Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University / Itani Junichiro Archives )
since 1957 PRIMATES The oldest international journal of primatology
PRIMATES is the oldest international journal of primatology published by Japan Monkey Centre in 1957. The object of this journal is to facilitate the research on the entire aspect of nonhuman primates in connection with man.

Museum section of JMC is taking on the role of delegating editorial board members/advisory board members/editor-in-chief, hosting editorial board meeting, and editorial operation of the journal PRIMATES.
PRIMATES

Since volume 44 (2003), PRIMATES is published by Springer.

See PRIMATES @ Springer website

Plan Your Visit to Japan Monkey Centre (JMC)

 
Address: 26, Inuyama-shi, Aichi 484-0081, JAPAN
20-minute walk from Inuyama Station on the Meitetsu Inuyama Line.

To Inuyama Station
From Meitetsu-Nagoya Station
About 25 minutes by the Rapid Limited Express (Kaisoku Tokkyu) or Limited Express (Tokkyu).

From Central Japan International Airport Station
About 55 minutes by μSKY Limited Express (Myu Sukai)

For further info, see Map and Transportation Guide @ INUYAMA Tourists Information Center Website
Opening Hours
10:00 - 16:00 (November - February)
10:00 - 17:00 (March - October)

Days Closed
Japan Monkey Centre (JMC) is closed every Tuesday and Wednesday. Additionally, JMC is closed weekdays in February. * Open on public holidays (Open on the following days: December 23, and February 11).
Admission Fees
Adult (Ages 18 and over) :
600 Japanese Yen
Junior  (Ages 7-15) :
400 Japanese Yen
Toddler  (Ages 3-6) :
300 Japanese Yen
Baby  (Age under 2) :
Free

CaPriCo
Database of Captive Primate Collection

See CaPriCo

Selected Report of PWS Activity



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