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67 different species

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The Japan Monkey Centre (JMC) is a museum and zoo that exhibits and breeds the largest number of nonhumnan primate species in the world.

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the 59th annual meeting of primates studies

 

Director's Welcome

The discipline of Primatology started in Japan on December 3rd, 1948. The late Kinji Imanishi (1902-1992) and his two students, from Kyoto University, went to Koshima Island to observe wild Japanese monkeys. By studying the social behavior of this monkey they aimed to understand the evolutionary origins of human society.


Most people may not realise that there are no species of monkeys or apes native to North America or Europe. Among G7 member state countries, Japan is unique. Japan has an indigenous species of monkey, called the Japanese or snow monkey, benefiting the study of nonhuman primates here.


Primatology is the scientific study of all primates, including humans. In order to understand ourselves as humans, it is essential to study our closest living relatives; people are keen to discover more about apes, monkeys, and prosimians such as lemurs.Thanks to the pioneering efforts of Kyoto University scholars, primatology in Japan began uniquely through fieldwork on the native wild monkeys.


Japanese primatologists worked together to help create the Japan Monkey Centre (JMC). It was founded on October 17th, 1956. The JMC aims to promote research, education, conservation, welfare, and communication to the public regarding nonhuman primates. JMC became a 'Public Interest Incorporated Foundation' from April 2014.

The JMC is also a registered museum, since 1957 producing the journal, “Primates”, now the oldest Primatology journal written in English. Primates is a leading journal in the discipline, published by Springer in collaboration with Primate Society Japan (PSJ). The JMC also runs a unique zoo, specializing in nonhuman primates, with over 1,000 individuals representing 67 different species.


This is the official website of JMC, with information about ongoing projects and news updates, in English. Join us for a window onto the world of nonhuman primates. Through observing nonhuman primates we can develop a better appreciation of our place within nature, a keener desire to understand the evolutionary origins of human society and behavior.


October 15th, 2014 in Kyoto
Tetsuro Matsuawa
General Director, Japan Monkey Centre
Editor-in-chief, PRIMATES
Professor, Kyoto University
President, International Primatological Society


Our Staff

Kazuo OIKE
Administrative Director
Tetsuro MATSUAWA
General Director
Juichi YAMAGIWA
Museum Director
Gen'ichi IDANI (Itani)
Zoo Director

Curators

Tomo TAKANO
Rie AKAMI
Gaku OHASHI
Yuta SHINTAKU
Koshiro WATANUKI
 

Our History

Under construction
since 1957

PRIMATES

The oldest English-language Primatology journal
PRIMATES

Primates is the oldest English-language Primatology journal, published by the Japan Monkey Centre (JMC) through Springer in collaboration with Primate Society Japan. The object of this journal is to facilitate the research on the entire aspect of nonhuman primates in connection with man. Museum section of JMC is taking on the role of delegating editorial board members/advisory board members/editor-in-chief, hosting editorial board meeting, and editorial operation of the journal PRIMATES.


Afterword of Volume 1, Issue 1 of Primates, October 25, 1957

Currently, there is no journal specializing in primatology; I declare that this is the very first primatology journal. Isn't this exciting? First of all, primatology department is non-existent in any university of the world, and therefore there is nothing such as an academic society for primatology. The modification in the operation of academic authority is evidenced by the fact that the Japan Monkey Centre (JMC) introduced the publication of this specialized journal, skipping the normal course of development, which is to begin by establishing a department at a university, followed by organizing an academic society, and then publishing a journal. The term "primatology" can be translated as "reichourui-gaku" in Japanese. But, we do not prefer such a difficult, orotund name. The primatology that we envision is a new scholarly endeavor to comprehensively investigate, so to speak, the genealogical history of humankind, by comparatively studying primates situated in various phylogenetic statuses, from various academic fields from the perspectives of not only morphology and development, but also physiology, psychology, ecology, sociology, and so forth.

It is from this standpoint that we conceived, an idea of gathering various primate species from around the world in a zoo that is expected to be built under the supervision of the JMC; we do not recklessly expand our research focus to include animals that do not share recent common genealogy with humankind. In this first volume, only articles that are based on naturalistic observations of Japanese monkeys could be included, but this journal seeks to gradually fulfill all the aforementioned ambitions. On the other hand, I request contributions from outside the country and promotion of the journal, until it achieves global recognition. I might have made too many irresponsible remarks, but I just want things to proceed in a lively manner, anticipating a bright future for us. Therefore, I sincerely ask your support and cooperation.

Kinji Imanishi


Message from Editor-in-Cheif, Primates

Editorial: New editorial board 2015-2017

In my capacity as the new Editor-in-Chief, I would like to announce that the new editorial board of the journal Primates comes into effect in January 2015, and will operate for the next three years. Primates is the oldest English-language Primatology journal, published by the Japan Monkey Centre (JMC) through Springer in collaboration with Primate Society Japan. The former Editor-in-chief, Juichi Yamagiwa, was recently elected as the 26th president of Kyoto University, and to replace him I have taken on the role of Editor-in-Chief from October 2014. I appreciate all the efforts of my colleagues who act as associate editors and advisory board members, without whom the journal could not achieve its aims. Please allow me to take this opportunity to look back over our history. Primatology in Japan began on December 3rd, 1948. It was on that day that the late Kinji Imanishi (1902-1992) and his two undergraduate students from Kyoto University set out for Koshima Island to observe wild Japanese monkeys.

By studying the social behavior of the monkeys they aimed to understand the evolutionary origins of human society. Primatology is the scientific study of all primates, including humans. In order to understand ourselves as humans, it is essential to study our closest living relatives; an interest in apes, monkeys, and prosimians is shared by scientists and laypeople alike. Japanese primatologists worked together to help create the JMC, founded on October 17th, 1956. Soon thereafter, in 1958, JMC sent the first expedition to Africa to study wild gorillas and chimpanzees. JMC aims to promote research, education, conservation, welfare, and communication to the public regarding nonhuman primates. JMC became a 'Public Interest Incorporated Foundation' from April 2014, and is a registered museum responsible for producing the journal Primates. It also runs a unique zoo, specializing in nonhuman primates, housing about 1000 individuals representing 67 different species. Through the scientific study of nonhuman primates we can develop a better appreciation of our own place within nature.

 
 

Plan Your Visit

Become a Member

Tomo-no-kai membership

Become a Member

Tomo-no-kai membership provides great benefits and privileges through the year! As a member you get free admission, free parking, and special access to members-only events.

Admission Prices

Adult600 yen

Elementary and junior high school student
400 yen

Preschool child (age 3 and over)
300 yen

Under 2'sFree

Parking

Regular vehicle

From Mar to mid-Dec1,000 yen

From mid-Dec to Feb500 yen

Bus/microbus1,500 yen
 

Hours

Opening Hours

November - February10:00 - 16:00

March - October10:00 - 17:00

Days Closed Tuesday and Wednesday


Japan Monkey Centre (JMC) is closed every Tuesday and Wednesday. Additionally, JMC is closed weekdays in February. * Open on public holidays (Open on the following days: December 23, and February 11).

 

Directions

map
Address: 26 Kanrin, Inuyama, Aichi 484-0081 JAPAN

Transportation
20-minute walk from Inuyama Station on the Meitetsu Inuyama Line.

To Inuyama Station
From Meitetsu-Nagoya Station
About 25 minutes by the Rapid Limited Express (Kaisoku Tokkyu) or Limited Express (Tokkyu).
From Central Japan International Airport Station
About 55 minutes by μSKY Limited Express (Myu Sukai)

For further info, see Map and Transportation Guide @ INUYAMA Tourists Information Center Website
 

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Educational Activities
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Annual meeting of Primates Studies

Upcoming!

The 59th Annual Meeting of Primates Studies
the 59th annual meeting of primates studies

We would like to invite you to the 59th annual meeting of primates studies hosted by Japan Monkey Centre (JMC). The annual meeting of primates studies has been in symposium-style with a specific theme since the 30th annual meeting in 1985, at the time of the birth of Primate Society of Japan. From April 2014, Japan Monkey Centre (JMC) became a ‘Public Interest Incorporated Foundation’. To mark our new endeavor, we would like to go back to the original and hold this year's annual meeting in conference-style.


The main missions of Japan Monkey Centre (JMC) are to promote research, conservation, environmental education on nonhuman primates as well as zoo installation in the light of animal welfare. This year’s annual meeting will offer a forum for cross-disciplinary discussion by having speakers from the various fields including primatology, conservation biology, wildlife biology, museology, and zoo science .


The annual meeting welcomes your attendance, with/without presentation. We are looking forward to presentations related to research, education, conservation and welfare in primatology.

Date

Saturday January 31st (10:00AM) - Sunday February 1st, 2015

A get-together party is scheduled on Saturday evening
Venue

Visitor Center @ Japan Monkey Centre (JMC)


Presentation styles

1. Oral: 15 minutes talk (12 minutes presentation + 3 minutes questions & answers)
2. Poster: Core time will be assigned on Saturday evening. The guidelines of poster size will be announced soon.

The presentations can be given in either Japanese or English. Please download the form (Word file) to submit the abstract


Eligibility for participation

The participant must be a member of "Tomo-no-kai membership". For those who are not, please visit the website to apply for membership.


How to register

To give a presentation, please register from here and submit the abstract to . To participate (no presentation), please register from here . You can register by telephone or fax. Please check ‘Contact’ below.


Deadline

Registration for presentation:
   Wednesday December 31st, 2014
Registration without presentation/Application for membership:
  Saturday January 24th, 2015


Fees
Participation fee: 500 yen
Get-together party fee: 3,000 yen (2,000 yen for students)

Please pay the fees in cash at the registration desk in the venue.
Contact
Organizer of Annual meeting of Primates Studies
Japam Monkey Centre (JMC)
Kanrin 26 Inuyama Aichi Japan 484-0081
TEL: 0568-61-2327
FAX: 0568-62-6823
Email:
Contact personnel: Yuta Shintaku

Host: Japan Monkey Centre (JMC)
Co-host: Leading Graduate Program in Primatology and Wildlife Science, Kyoto University
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